eurel

Données sociologiques et juridiques sur la religion en Europe et au-delà

Tweeter Rss

Accueil > Irlande > Droit et religion > Dispositions > Autres dispositions > Statut juridique des religions

Statut juridique des religions

Churches and religious groups in Ireland operate as voluntary religious systems and as such do not receive direct state funding. The salaries of religious clergy are paid for by voluntary contributions from the laity. In the case of the Catholic Church, the largest religious denomination, the state provides funding for the running of Catholic schools, which provide free primary and secondary schooling. Catholic parishes, dioceses and religious orders and congregations enjoy charitable tax exemption under tax law (see on line).

The situation with regard to private fee-paying religious schools (such as those operating under the Church of Ireland) is different. These schools receive a “Block Grant” from the state in addition to income from student tuition fees, in order to underwrite their denominational ethos. In October 2012 the national government announced it was considering the abolition of the “Block grant” scheme but a final decision has yet to be reached.

Marriages in Ireland are conducted either in the form of religious ceremonies or civil ceremonies. In either case a period of three month’s notice must be given to the state’s civil registration service. A couple who wish to marry in the Catholic Church arrange their marriage through their local parish. Participation in pre-marriage courses – operated through the Catholic marriage and family agency Accord – is typically required of couples who seek a Catholic marriage.

Marriages in the Church of Ireland tradition are also organized through the local parish.

A growing number of marriages in Ireland take place through the Registry Office in non-religious civil ceremonies. Civil marriages take place in secular settings such as a Registry Office or other public venue.

15 janvier 2013